Book Review: Hideous Progeny By Vaughn Entwistle

Hideous Progeny imagines a meeting between Mary Shelley, creator of Frankenstein, and Andrew Crosse, a scientist and early experimenter with electricity. In this version of events, Mary’s writing was inspired by her attendance at a lecture delivered by Crosse, and she is visiting him in later life in an attempt to lay the ghosts that have dogged her ever since.

Over the course of a day we see flashbacks to Mary’s earlier life, experience a severe storm and mind-boggling experiments, and witness a local mob trying to destroy the “wizard” Crosse and his unholy studies. Meanwhile, a parallel narrative moves to the final months of Mary’s life, when her brain tumour is advanced and she is slipping in and out of consciousness.

The novel takes us through the (mainly tragic) events of Mary’s life. It references her journals and the lives of those close to her: her husband Percy Bysshe Shelley and her children, most of whom did not live for very long. Lord Byron haunts the pages, and his daughter Ada Lovelace features in the story.

However, this is in no sense a biography. It is more an exploration of an inner life, a portrait of a woman haunted by the past – not just her lived past but also her fictional creation.

Like Frankenstein itself, Hideous Progeny is a Gothic novel, with an electric thunderstorm, scientific experiments, hallucinations, and intruders with malevolent intent. As with all the best Gothic tales it has supernatural – or at least fantastical – elements. It is multi-layered, bringing together Mary’s life and work with contemporary ideas about science and religion, a blend of knowledge, ignorance and superstition. We are sometimes left to wonder what is real and what is the product of Mary’s fevered imagination, as her brain tumour and increasing use of laudanum take their hold.

There are clear parallels with Frankenstein: “hideous progeny” is Mary’s own reference to her novel – both the book and the monster within it. The looming presence that always hovers around the periphery of Mary’s vision is the ghosts of her past and the monster she created. “Your story left me lost and alone, wandering in a frozen wilderness,” the monster tells her. “So I stole from you all that you have ever loved… I am within you… a malevolence growing in the brain that spawned me.”

Finally I was left to wonder, what would Mary Shelley have made of this book?

Hideous Progeny: Mary Shelley and her Monster, Vaughn Entwistle, Masque Publishing, 2020, 9780982883099

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